cialis generique

Recent News

30 Oct 2011
The shift in power in the smart phone market seems to be shifting, with Samsung taking the lead over Apple's iPhone.   Samsung overtook Apple to........
07 Oct 2011
After battling pancreatic cancer since 2004, legendary Apple ( AAPL ) cofounder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday . Jobs was 56 years old and his untimely........
07 Oct 2011
The new Apple iPhone was officially unveiled on October 4 at a launch event in California, and disappointment started with the name itself. This was not........
07 Oct 2011
American Airlines is contributing to a growth and development program that also offers rewards for flyers, according to a press release .  The Fort........

Steve Jobs: 1955-2011

After battling pancreatic cancer since 2004, legendary AppleAAPL ) cofounder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday . Jobs was 56 years old and his untimely death ignited a wave of outpouring across the globe, all for a man who Michael Bloomberg said "will be remembered with Edison and Einstein, and whose ideas will shape the world for generations to come." 

Jobs resigned from his post as Apple chief executive earlier in August, fueling suspicion that he was losing his long battle with pancreatic cancer. In a letter released by the company, Jobs asserted: 

"I have always said that if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple's C.E.O., I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come." 

Jobs, the adopted son of a Silicon Valley machinist, came of age in 1960s San Francisco. He graduated from high school in Cupertino in 1972, and had a brief stint at Reed College in Oregon before dropping out. 

Jobs met Steve Wozniak, whom he would later cofound Apple with, when he was in high school. The two friends shared an innate curiosity, one that would ultimately manifest itself in Apple. In 1976, Jobs and Wozniak used $1,300 they had saved and formed Apple, its base of operations centered in the Jobs' family garage. 

Wozniak and Jobs introduced Apple II in April 1977 at the West Coast Computer Faire in San Francisco. The acclaim that followed was unprecedented in scope, and sales surged from only $2 million that year to more than $600 million in 1981. The company introduced its iconic Macintosh in January 1984, piquing interest with its iconic 60-second commercial linking rival IBM to George Orwell's Big Brother. 

Apple struggled after Jobs lured former Pepsi chief executive John Sculley to the company. Jobs and Sculley became estranged after sales fell and the subsequent power struggle resulted in Jobs' ouster in 1985. During the following decade he acquired Pixar for $10 million. 

Under Jobs' tutelage the firm reorganized its efforts, ultimately releasing "Toy Story" in 1995, which revolutionized computer-generated imagery and was only the first in a string of commercial and critical successes that the studio has produced over the past 16 years. His initial investment paid off as the firm later went public, only to be purchased in 2006 by Disney for $7.4 billion. 

Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 as an adviser and became chief executive again in 2000. Under his second stint as head, he ushered in a new era in the American business landscape. The iPod and iTunes music store revolutionized the way consumers purchase and listen to their music. 

He later set his sights on the mobile phone market, and in June 2007 Apple introduced the first iteration of its mega-selling iPhone. Though the iPhone was not the first entry into the smartphone market, competitors rapidly adopted the iPhone's touch screen and intuitive operating system. More than 100 million of the devices have since been sold. 

Jobs also introduced the iPad, effectively creating a new market for tablet computers. Wildly successful, the iPad commands more than 65 percent of the tablet market.  

Apple's new chief executive, Tim Cook, asserted that with Jobs' death, "Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple." 

In a commencement address he delivered at Stanford University in 2005 , Jobs mused about death and its ability to inspire and challenge people to innovate. 

"No one wants to die," he told the graduates. "Death is very likely the single best invention of life. It is life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true."
Copyright © 2011 Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS), ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Copyright in the whole and every part of this website belongs to Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS) and may not be used, sold, licensed, transferred, copied or reproduced in whole or in part in any manner or form or in or on any media to any person other than in accordance with the terms of the Owner's agreement, without the prior written consent of the Owner Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS).
Steve Jobs: 1955-2011 cialis generique

Recent News

30 Oct 2011
The shift in power in the smart phone market seems to be shifting, with Samsung taking the lead over Apple's iPhone.   Samsung overtook Apple to........
07 Oct 2011
After battling pancreatic cancer since 2004, legendary Apple ( AAPL ) cofounder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday . Jobs was 56 years old and his untimely........
07 Oct 2011
The new Apple iPhone was officially unveiled on October 4 at a launch event in California, and disappointment started with the name itself. This was not........
07 Oct 2011
American Airlines is contributing to a growth and development program that also offers rewards for flyers, according to a press release .  The Fort........

Steve Jobs: 1955-2011

After battling pancreatic cancer since 2004, legendary AppleAAPL ) cofounder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday . Jobs was 56 years old and his untimely death ignited a wave of outpouring across the globe, all for a man who Michael Bloomberg said "will be remembered with Edison and Einstein, and whose ideas will shape the world for generations to come." 

Jobs resigned from his post as Apple chief executive earlier in August, fueling suspicion that he was losing his long battle with pancreatic cancer. In a letter released by the company, Jobs asserted: 

"I have always said that if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple's C.E.O., I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come." 

Jobs, the adopted son of a Silicon Valley machinist, came of age in 1960s San Francisco. He graduated from high school in Cupertino in 1972, and had a brief stint at Reed College in Oregon before dropping out. 

Jobs met Steve Wozniak, whom he would later cofound Apple with, when he was in high school. The two friends shared an innate curiosity, one that would ultimately manifest itself in Apple. In 1976, Jobs and Wozniak used $1,300 they had saved and formed Apple, its base of operations centered in the Jobs' family garage. 

Wozniak and Jobs introduced Apple II in April 1977 at the West Coast Computer Faire in San Francisco. The acclaim that followed was unprecedented in scope, and sales surged from only $2 million that year to more than $600 million in 1981. The company introduced its iconic Macintosh in January 1984, piquing interest with its iconic 60-second commercial linking rival IBM to George Orwell's Big Brother. 

Apple struggled after Jobs lured former Pepsi chief executive John Sculley to the company. Jobs and Sculley became estranged after sales fell and the subsequent power struggle resulted in Jobs' ouster in 1985. During the following decade he acquired Pixar for $10 million. 

Under Jobs' tutelage the firm reorganized its efforts, ultimately releasing "Toy Story" in 1995, which revolutionized computer-generated imagery and was only the first in a string of commercial and critical successes that the studio has produced over the past 16 years. His initial investment paid off as the firm later went public, only to be purchased in 2006 by Disney for $7.4 billion. 

Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 as an adviser and became chief executive again in 2000. Under his second stint as head, he ushered in a new era in the American business landscape. The iPod and iTunes music store revolutionized the way consumers purchase and listen to their music. 

He later set his sights on the mobile phone market, and in June 2007 Apple introduced the first iteration of its mega-selling iPhone. Though the iPhone was not the first entry into the smartphone market, competitors rapidly adopted the iPhone's touch screen and intuitive operating system. More than 100 million of the devices have since been sold. 

Jobs also introduced the iPad, effectively creating a new market for tablet computers. Wildly successful, the iPad commands more than 65 percent of the tablet market.  

Apple's new chief executive, Tim Cook, asserted that with Jobs' death, "Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple." 

In a commencement address he delivered at Stanford University in 2005 , Jobs mused about death and its ability to inspire and challenge people to innovate. 

"No one wants to die," he told the graduates. "Death is very likely the single best invention of life. It is life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true."
Copyright © 2011 Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS), ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Copyright in the whole and every part of this website belongs to Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS) and may not be used, sold, licensed, transferred, copied or reproduced in whole or in part in any manner or form or in or on any media to any person other than in accordance with the terms of the Owner's agreement, without the prior written consent of the Owner Crucial Solutions & Services (CSS).